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BELONGING IS HERE

BELONGING IS HERE
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THE CONCEPT AND GUIDING NARRATIVE BEHIND WITH.IN; BELONGING IS HERE


Written by METAXY member

Irina Samsonova
























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THE CONCEPT AND GUIDING NARRATIVE BEHIND WITH.IN; BELONGING IS HERE


Written by METAXY member

Irina Samsonova

Live in the house – then it will survive.
I can summon any given era,
I'll enter it to build my home inside.
And I will gather at the table there
Together both your children and your wives.
Same table for the kids and the grandparents…
(Arseny Tarkovsky, Life, 1965)


    “If art teaches anything”, said Joseph Brodsky in his Nobel Lecture, “it is the privateness of the human condition. Being the most ancient as well as the most literal form of private enterprise, it fosters in a man, knowingly or unwittingly, a sense of his uniqueness, of individuality, of separateness – thus turning him from a social animal into an autonomous “I”.

    Home is a symbol of human autonomy. We spend our lives coming home. Even if there is no home, there is a dream of it. “Home” is one of the all-encompassing anthropological and cultural constants in human history. The semantic field in which the “home” exists today is quite extensive: dwelling, refuge, the area of peace and freedom, independence, inviolability. Home is a hearth, family, love, constancy, and rhythm of an ordered life, “slow work”. The idea of home is extremely personal and, at the same time, universally relevant.  The simplicity of this concept is deceptive; it works like a strong lens through which we can see what is not immediately visible – our desire for safety and belonging.

    As the concept of privacy becomes more important in our life, our attitude to “home” also changes: we fill it with ourselves, merge with it, we look for it for a long time, in order to say later: “At last I am at home”. Home becomes a metaphor for everything that we consider ours: our thoughts and feelings, memories and sensations, relationships, knowledge, and skills. Since all these things require shelter, we create a place for them and thereby domesticate that space. In mythology, for a person “home” was the imaginary center of the world, the basic unit of space. In ancient times home was perceived as the quintessence of the world mastered by a human. Gradually, the opposition “home - world” in human life was replaced by parallel tendencies: to make your home your world, and to make the world your home.

    The German poet and philosopher Novalis wrote: “Philosophy is in itself nostalgia, the desire to be at home always and everywhere”. The search for meaning becomes the search for a home. The image of home, preserved from antiquity as a quiet haven in a stormy sea, also becomes a symbol of self-discovery. A journey in search of a home and a journey deep into oneself are two vectors in one direction: in search for meaning, and the definition of the boundaries between inner and outer space. A person becomes the builder of their being, creating the foundation and walls of their identity.


For Carl Jung homebuilding appeared similar to the natural process of life-development, and many philosophers, starting from Thomas Aquinas in "Summa Theologiae" and then René Descartes in "Meditations on First Philosophy", perceived philosophical thought as an imitation of an architectural skill. We can say that architecture is an image onto which a person projects their own inner content.

    Between the inner and outer space, home marks the boundaries within which we create our own protected territory. These boundaries are changeable, we open and close them, and redefine our relationship with ourselves, others, and with the surrounding space. Home is a set of contradictions: it is a refuge and a place from which to escape; an open space and a place of isolation from the outside world; a place where the past, present and future converge.

    Depending on how nomadic or settled we are, we can always carry our home with us and become our own home ourselves. A break with the past is thought of as a spatial movement. The path then replaces "home" and in some cases serves as "home". Like a magnetic compass, the dream of home draws us to people and places that we feel comfortable with. In search for this, we embark on a journey, real or imagined. We are looking for a place where we would like to return. Having lost a home, we grow it in ourselves from fragments of memory, and then rebuild it from the very beginning.

    In ancient philosophy the phrase "genius loci" meant the spirit of this or that space, transformed by human work and love. Thus, the "genius loci" becomes a transferable characteristic of the space that we fill with ourselves when we finally manage to find it. Maybe by finding your home, be it a place, people, or work that you feel you belong to, you yourself become a "Genius loci".

    “The poet Baratynsky, speaking of his Muse”, continued Brodsky in his lecture, “characterized her as possessing an “uncommon visage”. It’s in acquiring this “uncommon visage” that the meaning of human existence seems to lie, since for this uncommonness we are, as it were, prepared genetically. Regardless of whether one is a writer or a reader, one’s task consists first of all in mastering a life that is one’s own, not imposed or prescribed from without”. Everyone is looking for their own home which will not be like any other, but the most important question is what you fill this home with, when you find it.

    A seemingly simple concept of home has numerous sides, and this exhibition invites the viewer to take a closer look at many of them.

    It all starts with the desire to have a home. We will build our home together and then take it with us.


 SPARC* GALLERY
 FEB 05 ︎︎︎ 12th 2021 
SPARC* GALLERY
FEB 05 ︎︎︎ 12th 2021